COIL

In Performance: Angela Goh, Desert Body Creep (COIL)

Desert Body Creep Angela Goh COIL, Performance Space New York January 16-17 Desert Body Creep, choreographed and performed by Angela Goh with sound operation by Matt Cornell, is something of a post-anthropocene hallucination. As Goh literally moves through choreographies, sounds, and objects, the mundane becomes uncanny. Goh’s body turns until it becomes an object, which then comes back to life, becomes the earth, and regenerates itself. It’s a methodical yet dizzying evolution involving a giant gummy worm, a mint-hued crushed velvet tube, and shrinkwrap, underscored in cinematic turns by shredding guitar solos, pop music, and Goh’s own voice in haunting choral overtones. The result is a capitvating, unaffected disorientation posing questions of objectification inside the environment and t...

In Performance: Heather Kravas, visions of beauty (COIL)

visions of beauty Heather Kravas COIL, Performance Space New York January 10-13 Described in the program as “punk in attitude, feminist in spirit”, Heather Kravas’s visions of beauty fulfills this promise most unexpectedly, foregoing distorted guitars and raised fists for a tender choreographic minimalism. With an unflinchingly precise and deceptively gentle touch, Kravas’s movement scores use dance foundations as an entry point to expose the implicit labor of form. Upon entering the space, an ensemble of nine dancers is splayed out in a giant starfish formation, each performer touching another at either the hands or feet. While we do not learn the gender identities of any performers, what we see are one female-bodied dancer and eight male-bodied dancers. The relentless tick of a kitchen t...

In Performance: Atlanta Eke, Body of Work (COIL)

  Body of Work Atlanta Eke COIL Festival, Performance Space New York January 10-11, 2018 With Body of Work, Australian choreographer Atlanta Eke has created an offbeat meditation on time and space, reifying and redefining the present moment over and over again over the course of an hour. While the piece is technically a solo, it might be more accurately described as a duet between performer Ivey Wawn and a camera which gazes at her from the threshold between audience and stage. With her image projected live onto two human-sized projection screens onstage, Wawn meets the camera’s gaze directly, moving and engaging with her own body doubles until our eyes get lost in loops of visual logic and reason. Wawn’s presence is precise and elegant as she progresses through movement scores with a...